Banning the Bomb: Pakistan’s Perspective

Calls to ban the bomb are as old as the bomb itself. From the founding of the Federation of American Scientists (1945) to the Russel-Einstein manifesto (1955) and recently, the Humanitarian Pledge (2014), politicians, nuclear scientists, scholars, and activists have persistently campaigned against the use of nuclear weapons, urging states to exercise maximum restraint or … More Banning the Bomb: Pakistan’s Perspective

The Uri Attack and the Civil-Military Divide in Pakistan’s Kashmir Policy-The Diplomat

The September 18 terrorist attack in Uri, which killed 19 Indian soldiers in peacetime, is not the first incident abetted and denied by Pakistan, perhaps nor the last. Exactly eight years ago in September 2008, when Mumbai was attacked by a squad of well-trained terrorists that killed nearly 200 people and wounded several more, Pakistan vehemently denied … More The Uri Attack and the Civil-Military Divide in Pakistan’s Kashmir Policy-The Diplomat

Why Do Coups Happen in Pakistan: A Rejoinder-The Diplomat

Daim Fazil’s August 25 article in The Diplomat is a brilliant read for anyone to understand the science and fiction behind military coups—soft and hard—in Pakistan. The writer argues that the military coups take place in Pakistan because of three main factors: eternal political strife; lack of consensus among political parties (leaders) on the economic front; and … More Why Do Coups Happen in Pakistan: A Rejoinder-The Diplomat

Who Leads Coups in Pakistan: The Military or the Establishment?-The Diplomat

In the wake of Turkey’s failed coup, a relatively obscure movement called “Move on Pakistan” hung posters of country’s chief of army staff (COAS), General Raheel Sharif, urging the general to take over the government. In response, Ejaz Haider, a political analyst and talk show host, told the New York Times, “There’s no direct evidence of … More Who Leads Coups in Pakistan: The Military or the Establishment?-The Diplomat